Tag Archives: battleship

70,000 Tons of Battleship Terror: How the Biggest Battleship Ever Committed Suicide

70,000 Tons of Battleship Terror: How the Biggest Battleship Ever Committed Suicide

Kyle Mizokami

Security,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_battleship_Yamato#/media/File:Yamato_during_Trial_Service.jpg

The Japanese Yamato had well-earned esteem. 

Key Point: The Yamato was part of the last line of battleships that dominated the seas, before the supremacy of the aircraft carrier took hold.

In early 1945, the Imperial Japanese Navy made a difficult decision: it would sacrifice the largest, most powerful battleships ever built to protect Okinawa, the gateway to Japan’s Home Islands. The decision sealed the fate of the battleship Yamato and its crew, but ironically did nothing to actually protect the island from Allied invasion.

The battleship Yamato was among the largest and most powerful battleships of all time. Yamato has reached nearly mythical status, a perfect example of Japan’s fascination with doomed, futile heroics. Built in 1937 at the Kure Naval Arsenal near Hiroshima, it was constructed in secrecy to avoid alarming the United States. Japan had recently withdrawn from the Washington Naval Treaty, which limited battleship tonnages, and was free to build them as large as it wanted.

And what ships it built. 839 feet at the waterline and weighing seventy thousand tons fully loaded, Yamato was the largest ship of the war, eclipsed only by postwar American aircraft carriers. It and its sister, Musashi, were armed with nine eighteen-inch naval guns, mounted in turrets of three; six 155-millimeter secondary naval guns; twenty-four five-inch guns; 162 twenty-five-millimeter antiaircraft guns; and four 13.2-millimeter heavy machine guns.

All of this firepower was meant to sink enemy battleships—more than one at a time if necessary. The extremely large number of antiaircraft guns, added during a refit, were meant to keep the ship afloat in the face of American air power until it could close within striking range of enemy ships.

Unfortunately for Yamato and its crew, it was obsolete by the time it was launched in 1941. The ability of fast aircraft carriers to engage enemy ships at the range of their embarked dive and torpedo bombers meant a carrier could attack a battleship at ranges of two hundred miles or more, long before it entered the range of a battleship’s guns. Battleships were “out-sticked,” to use a modern term.

Read full article


Source : Link to Author

Hitler’s Battleship Tirpitz Never Fought Another Battleship (But Nearly Sank Thanks to a Submarine)

Hitler’s Battleship Tirpitz Never Fought Another Battleship (But Nearly Sank Thanks to a Submarine) Sebastien Roblin Security, A mini-sub, that is. The Tirpitz was the follow-on sistership of the notorious Bismarck, a monster battleship designed from the get-go to vastly … read more

‘Built like a battleship’: Grab old-school Stanley lunchboxes and camping gear at up to 66 percent off, today only!

‘Built like a battleship’: Grab old-school Stanley lunchboxes and camping gear at up to 66 percent off, today only! Shop it: Stanley Classic Lunch Box, $26 (was $39), amazon.com Stanley Classic Vacuum Bottle. (Photo: Amazon/Yahoo Lifestyle) More Shop it: Stanley Classic … read more

Hitlers’ Nightmare: How Did Britain Sink the Nazis’ Deadly Bismarck Battleship?

Hitlers’ Nightmare: How Did Britain Sink the Nazis’ Deadly Bismarck Battleship? Warfare History Network History, Europe An impressive feat. Key point: The Bismarck was a technological wonder, but that didn’t save it from destruction. In 1960 Twentieth Century Fox released the … read more

Hitler’s Most Powerful Battleship Was Severely Damaged by Midget Submarines

Hitler’s Most Powerful Battleship Was Severely Damaged by Midget Submarines Warfare History Network Security, Americas Battleships are very vulnerable at anchorage. Key point: How one of Hitler’s most powerful warships was taken out of actions–and ultimately for good.  By mid-1942, … read more