Peter King predicts where Tom Brady, Philip Rivers, top QBs will go in offseason

Peter King predicts where Tom Brady, Philip Rivers, top QBs will go in offseason

Andy Dalton; the Patriots would probably have to pay a third or fourth-round pick for Dalton, who has a year left on his contract and no future in Cincinnati. (The Patriots have two thirds and two fourths, including a likely third-round compensatory pick.) If Belichick makes up his mind that it’s time to move on from Brady, then my argument is moot. Dalton, by the way, would be my pick to start in New England next year if Brady goes. Belichick would love Dalton. He’s a quiet, intense, lunchpail Texan who makes no excuses. And Dalton would embrace the Patriot ethos.’ data-reactid=”15″>I’ll preface this by saying none of this logic matters if Bill Belichick has already decided he wants to start a new era that doesn’t include a 43-year-old quarterback who makes a lot of money. Belichick might want to begin anew with a quarterback he feels is good and who costs significantly less—someone like 32-year-old Andy Dalton; the Patriots would probably have to pay a third or fourth-round pick for Dalton, who has a year left on his contract and no future in Cincinnati. (The Patriots have two thirds and two fourths, including a likely third-round compensatory pick.) If Belichick makes up his mind that it’s time to move on from Brady, then my argument is moot. Dalton, by the way, would be my pick to start in New England next year if Brady goes. Belichick would love Dalton. He’s a quiet, intense, lunchpail Texan who makes no excuses. And Dalton would embrace the Patriot ethos.

Deion Jones on tight end Cameron Brate. Pick six. “It smells as bad as it could possible smell,” Arians said after the game. The Bucs had a clear path to a redemptive 9-7 season, but six interceptions in the last two weeks ruined that.’ data-reactid=”41″>It’s dangerous, of course, to consider giving up on Jameis Winston, the number one pick in 2015. He’s a dynamic passer, well-liked by teammates and coaches. And Arians and offensive coordinator may think they can fix the seemingly fatal carelessness that ails Winston, who has thrown more picks than any quarterback since entering the league. But I noticed something with Arians this season. He defended almost every Winston miscue for the first three months of the season. In December, though, that changed. Tampa was 7-7 entering the last two games, both at home. In game 15, against Houston, Winston threw interceptions on two of the first five Buc snaps, and Tampa was down 10-0 after four minutes. The Bucs lost by three. Next week: Overtime against Atlanta. First play, Winston somehow didn’t see lurker linebacker Deion Jones on tight end Cameron Brate. Pick six. “It smells as bad as it could possible smell,” Arians said after the game. The Bucs had a clear path to a redemptive 9-7 season, but six interceptions in the last two weeks ruined that.

So what does that have to do with now? Which free-agent quarterback would you pursue, assuming Bridgewater is free:

• Winston, 26, with a career 61.3 completion percentage and 86.9 passer rating, and a prodigious 121 touchdowns in five years. But he had 30 interceptions in 16 games in 2019.

• Or Bridgewater, 27, with a career 65.2 completion percentage and 88.3 passer rating, and a pedestrian 38 touchdowns in 44 career games. He has 25 interceptions in 44 career games.

Read the last two sentences, and think of how a coach would think about turnovers.

Tyrod Taylor, who was Rivers’ backup and is well-respected inside the Chargers, could get the first snaps of 2020 in new So-Fi Stadium while the quarterback of the future (Justin Herbert?) marinates for a few months or a season after being the seventh overall pick. Might be a tough sell to a public already skeptical of the Chargers’ ability to make Los Angeles home, but GM Tom Telesco is charged with winning, not selling luxury seating.’ data-reactid=”53″>Logic says the Chargers, but I won’t be surprised if the new kids in L.A. are going to be more of draft-and-develop than big splash. That changes, of course, if Brady comes. Tyrod Taylor, who was Rivers’ backup and is well-respected inside the Chargers, could get the first snaps of 2020 in new So-Fi Stadium while the quarterback of the future (Justin Herbert?) marinates for a few months or a season after being the seventh overall pick. Might be a tough sell to a public already skeptical of the Chargers’ ability to make Los Angeles home, but GM Tom Telesco is charged with winning, not selling luxury seating.

Newton will play 2020 at age 31. He is five years removed from his MVP season. But you don’t have to go back that far to see when he was good for a sustained period. Under Norv Turner in the first half of 2018 in Carolina, the Panthers were 6-2, Newton completed 67 percent with 15 TDs and four interceptions, and he beat Super Bowl champion Philadelphia at the Linc, as well as Baltimore and Tampa with near-perfect games. It’s true that, post-shoulder surgery, no one’s sure exactly who Newton is. But I’d look into him thoroughly if I were the Chargers . . . and I wouldn’t close the door on him if I were the Panthers.

It’s the only choice for a team that needs a long-term quarterback. Burrow is not just the best choice because he’s the local-boy-making-good (his Athens, Ohio, home is 2.5 hours east of Cincinnati on U.S. 50). He’s the best choice because he’s the best quarterback. Coach Zac Taylor likes a quarterback who can play equally well from the pocket—where a lot of his throws will be designed to come from—and also can be proficient on the move, often times on designed movement throws. If you watched Burrow, particularly when he had to move some against defenses like Alabama’s, you’ll know what Taylor likes is what Burrow can do very well. Burrow doesn’t take too many chances, he’s above-average accurate downfield, and, with the shaky Cincinnati offensive line, won’t be cowed by pass-rushes pushing him out of the pocket.

Burrow, a coach’s son, will also fit well with Taylor because he always was able to understand the “why” to so many defensive schemes in talks with his dad Jim, the former Ohio University defensive coordinator. And Taylor wants his quarterback to understand where each play in the game plan fits in the grander scheme of the total plan for a game. Burrow is thoughtful and confident, and he and Taylor will be a good combo platter.

Now, whether it works—who knows? But Burrow is the favorite to go first overall, and to Cincinnati.

A bunch of teams could theoretically jump Miami (picking fifth) in the first round if Tagovailoa or Justin Herbert becomes the object of affection between now and the draft. Teams at 6 (Chargers), 7 (Panthers), 12 (Raiders) or 13 (Colts) all might be tempted. But Miami, with four picks in the top 40, could trump them all. I doubt Miami exits this draft without a quarterback it likes very much.

The contract has gotten ugly, but it seems foolhardy to suggest he won’t be back in Dallas.

Read more from Peter King’s Football Morning in America column here.‘ data-reactid=”65″>Read more from Peter King’s Football Morning in America column here.


Source : Peter King on NBC Sports Link